Why Manufacturing Digital Transformation Fail

Why Manufacturing Digital Transformation Fail

The digital transformation journey is fraught with danger. Having a successful project could result in happier customers, more business, increased margins, and a more successful company. Having a failed or even only partially successful project could mean just the opposite with potentially dire consequences not just for stakeholders but the entire company as well.

So why do digital transformations fail? We share five common insights impacting digital transformations:

  1. Success looks different to different people. While you may think you have clearly stated the final goal of the project ensuring everyone is on the same page with the same destination in mind is key. As an example, rolling out a new IIOT project means involvement with the network and applications operations teams. Are their expected actions (related to their success) and incentives clearly defined and aligned with the rollout?

  2. Know where you are before you begin. Ensuring you have an accurate baseline of current performance is critical for a successful project. If you do not have insights into a machine’s operational baseline before your transformation, how are you going to know if the project is successful? Are the proper tools in place before you embark on your journey?

  3. Be decisive with facts. With the operational baseline in hand, continue gathering information throughout the transformation lifecycle. For an organization rolling out Office 365, the user experience must not be impacted by the transition. Nothing is worse than having an “Everything is Green” situation. See our “Everything is Green yet users are complaining. What is your next move?” blog for more information. Are you able to gather information continuously for informed decisions?

  4. Transformation tracking. You need to track every step of the transformation process from conception to implementation through post-deployment. An enterprise looking to cut cost with an  SD-WAN deployment needs to identify key milestones: vendor selection, test with pilot locations and eventually enterprise rollout. Are you able to track the promise of lower cost and operational simplicity with SD-WAN while keeping the user experience intact at every step?

  5. Be outcome oriented not activity oriented. The definition of done needs to be defined and definite.  Focus is on the outcome not the process or the activity. An organization rolling out SD-LAN, could experience changes such as adding additional segments for users/applications during the rollout. The changes identified are important but are they necessary for the success of the project? Have you analyzed the trade-offs?

Sinefa is helping more than 700 organizations gain performance intelligence to foster collaboration between teams and provide improved user experiences to power successful digital transformations.

The shifting enterprise edge. Part 2

The shifting enterprise edge. Part 1 of 5. CSP or CSP

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